The Bugatti Veyron EB 16.4 is a mid-engined grand touring car, designed and developed by the Volkswagen Group and manufactured in Molsheim, France by Bugatti Automobiles S.A.S.

The Super Sport version of the Veyron is the fastest street-legal production car in the world, with a top speed of 431.072 km/h (267.856 mph). The original version has a top speed of 408.47 km/h (253.81 mph).

Manufacturer Bugatti Automobiles S.A.S.
Production
  • 2005–2011 (Veyron 16.4)
  • 2009–present (Grand Sport)
  • 2010–present (Super Sport)
Assembly Molsheim, Alsace, France
Predecessor Bugatti EB110
Class Sports car
Body style
  • coupé (16.4, Super Sport)
  • targa top (16.4, Grand Sport Vitesse)
Layout Longitudinal mid-engine,
permanent 4WD
Engine Standard:
8.0 L (488 cu in) W16quad-turbocharged 1,001 PS (736 kW; 987 bhp)
Super Sport:
1,200 PS (883 kW; 1,184 bhp)
Transmission 7-speed DSG sequential
Wheelbase 2,710 mm (106.7 in)
Length 4,462 mm (175.7 in)
Width 1,998 mm (78.7 in)
Height 1,159 mm (45.6 in)
Kerb weight 1,888 kg (4,162 lb)
Designer(s) Jozef Kaban

Origin of the car

In 1998, the Volkswagen Group purchased the trademark rights on the former car manufacturer Bugatti in order to revive the brand. Starting with the Bugatti EB118, they presented at various international auto shows a total of four 18-cylinder concept cars. At the 1999 Tokyo Motor Show, the first study of the Veyron was presented. At the time the name of the concept car was “Bugatti Veyron EB 18.4” and it was equipped with a 18-cylinder engine instead of the 16-cylinder engine of the production version. While the three previous prototypes had been styled by Giugiaro, the Veyron was designed by the Volkswagen stylists.

The decision to start production of the car was taken by the Volkswagen Group in 2001. The first roadworthy prototype was completed in August 2003. It is identical except for a few details to the later series variant. In the development to series production, however, considerable technical problems had to be addressed, so that the start of production was delayed repeatedly, until September 2005.

Basic Specifications
Layout and body style Mid-engine, four-wheel drive, two-door coupé/targa top Base price €1,225,000 (GB£1,065,000/US$1,700,000)
Super Sport:
€1,912,500 (GB£1,665,000/US$2,700,000)
Internal combustion engine 8.0 litre W16, 64v 2xDOHC quad-turbocharged petrol engine Engine displacement
and max. power
7,993 cc (487.8 cu in)
1,001 metric horsepower (736 kW; 987 bhp)
Super Sport:
1,200 metric horsepower (883 kW; 1,184 bhp)
Performance
Top speed 408.47 km/h (253.81 mph) (average)
Super Sport:
431.072 km/h (267.856 mph) (average)
0–100 km/h (0.0–62.1 mph) 2.46 seconds 0–240 km/h (0.0–149.1 mph) 9.8 seconds
0–300 km/h (0.0–186.4 mph)
14.6 seconds 0–400 km/h (0.0–248.5 mph)
55 seconds
Standing quarter-mile (402 m)
10.2 seconds (standard), 9.9 seconds (Super Sport)
Braking 31.4 m (from 100 km/h to 0)
Fuel economy
EPA city driving 8 miles per U.S. gallon (29 L/100 km; 9.6 mpg-imp) EPA highway driving 13 miles per U.S. gallon (18 L/100 km; 16 mpg-imp)
Top speed fuel economy 3 miles per U.S. gallon (78 L/100 km; 3.6 mpg-imp), or 1.4 U.S. gal (5.3 L; 1.2 imp gal) per minute

Bugatti Veyron Super Sport (2010–)

The Veyron Super Sport features an engine power increase from the standard 1,001 PS (736 kW; 987 bhp) to 1,200 PS (880 kW; 1,200 bhp) and torque of 1,500 N·m (1,100 lbf·ft) and a revised aerodynamic package. It has a 431.072 km/h (267.856 mph) top speed, making it the fastest road car in production, although it is electronically limited to 415 km/h (258 mph) to protect the tyres from disintegrating. It was shown publicly for the first time at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance in August 2010. The first five of an unannounced production run made its debut in a matte black and orange colour combination, all of which have been spoken for. It is valued at GB£1.7 million and Bugatti have stated that only 30 will be produced.

On 4 July 2010 James May, a television presenter on BBC’s show Top Gear, drove the Veyron Super Sport at 259 mph (417 km/h). Later that day, Bugatti’s official test driver Pierre Henri Raphanel drove the Super Sport version of the Veyron on Volkswagen’s Ehra-Lessien high-speed test track to establish the car’s top speed. With representatives of the Guinness Book of Recordsand German Technical Inspection Agency (TÜV) on hand, Raphanel made passes around the big oval in both directions achieving an average maximum speed of 431.072 km/h (267.856 mph), thus taking back the title from the SSC Ultimate Aero TT as the fastest production vehicle of all time. The 431.072 km/h mark was reached by averaging the Super Sport’s two test runs, the first reaching 427.93 km/h (265.90 mph) and the second 434.20 km/h (269.80 mph). Once produced for sale, the first five Super Sports will sport the same black and orange finish as the first production car which was used to set the speed record.

 

 

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